2021 



The Milrem Robotics’ Summer School internship program that started at the beginning of July resulted in a functioning one-hand remote for the THeMIS UGV developed by the participants of the program.

Although the one-hand operation of the THeMIS has been possible using its standard remote, a dedicated one-hand remote had yet to be developed. Until now.

The remote will still need some further advancement until it can be shipped out along with the vehicles, but completing the prototype is no small accomplishment.

In addition to the remote, interns also made the THeMIS controllable via a standard PC. As explained by Joonas Kaljulaid, the responsible Project Manager for the Summer School program, this will simplify tethered operations of the vehicle in the future.

One of the six interns was specialized in Quality Assurance and had by the end of the four-week program verified our Mission Control hardware capabilities and software features.

This year, six interns were selected out of 100 applicants to take part in Milrem Robotics’ Summer School program. Two of the interns have already signed on for part-time employment with the company. It is worth noting that all three participants of Summer School 2020 are also part of Milrem Robotics’ family.

Read more about working in Milrem Robotics.


2020 


The Milrem Robotics’ Summer School internship program that started at the beginning of July resulted in a functioning wired follow me solution for the THeMIS UGV developed by the three participants of the program.

It is quite easy to pull something using a wire, however, try pushing something with one. That is exactly what the three participants in our Summer School program pulled off only in four weeks.


Using logical thinking, argumentation, and engineering skills software engineer Tavo Annus, mechanical engineer Mattias Kitsing and electronics Engineer Eke Tominga developed a solution to operate Milrem Robotics’ THeMIS UGV using only a thin wire.


“This solution will allow hands free operation of the UGV that may be extremely useful in certain situations,” said Siim Reinaas, team lead in Milrem Robotics and a supervisor of the project. “Not a bad way to spend your summer – figuring out how to make a 1,5 ton move using only a thin wire and developing such a system from the ground up,” he added.